Back to School with Tourette Syndrome

Published: August 8th, 2017

By: Heather Simpson

Category: Tourette Updates, treatment

The summer is winding down, back-to-school shopping is inevitable and parent-teacher conferences are right around the corner. With the laid-back atmosphere of the summer, it can be difficult for children with Tourette syndrome (TS), as well as their parents to get transition back to the structured setting of school.

When tics and the co-occurring conditions of TS worsen around the beginning of the school year, it is important to prepare for this transition prior to the start of the first day of school.

Finding resources and advocacy materials can be difficult, so we have compiled many resources that you can use to help with the transition.

Tourette Association of America

ADDitude Magazine

Understood

Anxiety and Depression Society of America (ADAA)

Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD)

When speaking to the school, some useful tips to remember:

  • Keep things positive:
    • Don’t forget to bring in the strengths of your child
    • Thank the teacher and school for their work with your child. Since teachers desire to improve the lives of their students, we want to make sure that the teachers themselves feel supported.
    • The ADDitude Magazine provides a resource for seven strategies for talking to the school.
  • Have support:
    • Have a written letter. This can be from a physician or therapist describing strengths and possible accommodations recommendations.
    • Create a peer-support system at school to increase your child’s confidence.
    • Utilize the your local TAA support group chapter

If you would like further resources, contact your local therapist or Center of Excellence.

 

About the Author

Heather Simpson, OTR/L

Heather Simpson

Heather Simpson graduated with a B.S. in Exercise and Sport Science with a minor in Early Education from the University of Florida in 2007. Following her Bachelor’s degree, Heather received a Master’s…

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